Blog Archives

Reflecting on Keith Green’s Impact 30 years after His Tragic Death


Today, July 28th, 2012, marks the 30th anniversary of Keith Green’s death.  I wasn’t even a Christian back in 1982, and had no clue who this great man of God was.  When I became a Christian in 1985, I was immediately introduced to him.  He had a profound impact on my life.

Back then, contemporary Christian music was in its infancy.  The local Christian book store had an 8′ x 4′ section of a wall dedicated to it.  There wasn’t much! Basically it was Read the rest of this entry

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We’ve Come to Worship, but Will We Worship God or Ourselves?


Dan Lucarini’s, in his book Why I Left the Christian Contemporary Music Movement,  has some thought-provoking and counter-cultural takes on contemporary worship.  One that gets right to the heart of the issue is this one:

“When we try to feel an experience of affirmation from worship, we are not worshiping God.  We are worshiping our own egos.” (pp. 56-57)

In other words, when we come to “worship”, if our goal is to get some type of positive experience out of it for ourselves, we are not really coming for Him.  In essence, we are “worshipping” our own egos.  If our motivation in coming to worship is for what we will get out of it, then we are worshiping.  We are just worshipping ourselves, and not the Savior.

Whoa there fella, that is a huge statement.  Practically everyone I have ever served on a worship team with or led, Read the rest of this entry

Saturday Morning Funnies: How Not to Introduce a New Song


How Contemporary Christian Music and the Seeker-Sensitive Movements Failed a Generation


“It’s 1994, and Michael Stipe recently lost his religion. It’s before Bieber and bling, before ordering a latte required six qualifying adjectives. In coffeehouses across the country, bored teens slouch on thrift-store couches nodding along to the Cranberries’ “Zombie.” Weezer breaks into the alt-rock scene with the Blue Album; Green Day tops the charts with the first punk rock song to whine about a lousy therapist. In April, hordes of fans gather in Seattle Park to mourn the death of Kurt Cobain. A few months later, 350,000 people make the pilgrimage to Read the rest of this entry