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Discover The Early Church – “We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them!


JustinEasy to read.

Hard to put down.

Inspiring.

Informative.

Effortless introduction into the writings of the early church.

Download it and start reading it today for less than  $6 on Amazon

“We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them”  is a must read book for every Christian.  It contains two early church writings:  Justin Martyrs First Apology and Octavius, written by Mark Felix.

If you want an introduction into how the early church thought about Jesus, Salvation, predestination, communion and life after death, and how they lived out the faith, this is the easiest introduction I know.  Thanks to the modern translation, the works practically read themselves.

Next to the Bible, the early Christian writings are the most valuable documents of Christianity.  They teach us what the church was like immediately after the events recorded in the New Testament. What a rich resource they are. Yet, for many followers of Christ , they remain a mystery.  You know all about the history of the United States and how it started.  You probably know a lot about how your own denomination began or at least how the Reformation started. Shouldn’t we all be familiar with how Christianity grew in the first and second century?

Don’t stay in the dark.  Read this book:  “We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them” 

When a second-century pagan ridiculed Christians for their lack of education, one Christian replied, “We don’t speak great things we live them!” That was the essence of early Christianity. It was not a Christianity of words, but rather of holy, obedient living.

This book contains two second-century Christian works, translated into readable contemporary English: Mark Felix’s Octavius and Justin Martyr’s First Apology. They describe the dynamic, living church of the second century and discuss what Christians of that age believed.

The First Apology of Justin Martyr is the oldest Christian apology still in existence in its entirety. Justin penned this work at the risk of his own life. Apart from the inspired New Testament writings, this apology is perhaps the single most valuable work of early Christianity. Through it, we can take a peek through time to see what Christianity was like at the close of the apostolic age. For example, Justin takes us on a tour of a Christian baptism and a typical Sunday morning church service. He lets us know what Christians in his age believed about Jesus, salvation, predestination, communion, and life after death.

Octavius, written by a Christian lawyer named Mark Felix, takes a look at Christianity from both the pagan and Christian view points. It’s not only one of the most readable early Christian works, but it’s also a true work of literature. Felix writes in a graceful style that rivals that of Cicero, and his defense of Christianity is truly inspiring. In the end, Octavius is more than a challenge to the pagan Romans it’s a challenge to the twentieth century church as well.

“We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them” Justin Martyr and Mark Felix

 

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