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Discover The Early Church – “We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them!


JustinEasy to read.

Hard to put down.

Inspiring.

Informative.

Effortless introduction into the writings of the early church.

Download it and start reading it today for less than  $6 on Amazon

“We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them”  is a must read book for every Christian.  It contains two early church writings:  Justin Martyrs First Apology and Octavius, written by Mark Felix.

If you want an introduction into how the early church thought about Jesus, Salvation, predestination, communion and life after death, and how they lived out the faith, this is the easiest introduction I know.  Thanks to the modern translation, the works practically read themselves.

Next to the Bible, the early Christian writings are the most valuable documents of Christianity.  They teach us what the church was like immediately after the events recorded in the New Testament. What a rich resource they are. Yet, for many followers of Christ , they remain a mystery.  You know all about the history of the United States and how it started.  You probably know a lot about how your own denomination began or at least how the Reformation started. Shouldn’t we all be familiar with how Christianity grew in the first and second century?

Don’t stay in the dark.  Read this book:  “We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them” 

When a second-century pagan ridiculed Christians for their lack of education, one Christian replied, “We don’t speak great things we live them!” That was the essence of early Christianity. It was not a Christianity of words, but rather of holy, obedient living.

This book contains two second-century Christian works, translated into readable contemporary English: Mark Felix’s Octavius and Justin Martyr’s First Apology. They describe the dynamic, living church of the second century and discuss what Christians of that age believed.

The First Apology of Justin Martyr is the oldest Christian apology still in existence in its entirety. Justin penned this work at the risk of his own life. Apart from the inspired New Testament writings, this apology is perhaps the single most valuable work of early Christianity. Through it, we can take a peek through time to see what Christianity was like at the close of the apostolic age. For example, Justin takes us on a tour of a Christian baptism and a typical Sunday morning church service. He lets us know what Christians in his age believed about Jesus, salvation, predestination, communion, and life after death.

Octavius, written by a Christian lawyer named Mark Felix, takes a look at Christianity from both the pagan and Christian view points. It’s not only one of the most readable early Christian works, but it’s also a true work of literature. Felix writes in a graceful style that rivals that of Cicero, and his defense of Christianity is truly inspiring. In the end, Octavius is more than a challenge to the pagan Romans it’s a challenge to the twentieth century church as well.

“We Don’t Speak Great Things – We Live Them” Justin Martyr and Mark Felix

 

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Get This Must Have Book On Early Church History


The Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs by David W. Bercot, is a must have book for anyone interested in learning what the early church fathers taught.  Extremely informative and  very easy to read and use!  I am thrilled that I found it about 3 years ago.  So much so,  that I wanted to let you all know about it.

Most evangelical disciples of the 21st century have had their theological views shaped primarily from the arguments of the 1500’s.  That is 1500+ years removed from the actual events.  Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to go back and read what the early disciples taught about these matters?  Of course, you can, but it has been a tedious endeavor.  Up until now.  This book is written in a format that allows simple and easy access to the writings of the early church fathers of the first 300 years of church history (The Anti-Nicene Fathers).

How did the disciples of the Apostles and their disciples view original sin, the trinity, free-will, predestination, God’s sovereignty and fore-knowledge, worship, music in church services, parenting, salvation, eternal security or Read the rest of this entry

Back to the Future: Sunday Morning Church Service circa 150 AD


In the movie “Back To The Future”,  17 year old, Marty Mcfly, lives a lousy life. His dad, George, a nerdy scaredy cat, and his mom, Larraine, is an alcoholic, who met George through pity, when her dad hit George with a car.   All he has ever known is this reality.  The only thing that he can do for fun, is hang out with the local scientist, Dr. Emmit Brown (Doc) who has created a time machine.  You know the story.  Marty goes back in time and changes how his parents meet.  In the process everything that was wrong with his life and family  is dramatically changed for the good.

When I contemplate the current state of the American Evangelical church, I wish we could get into that DeLorean and head back in time.  If we could, perhaps we would be able to intervene at just the right moment so that today’s church reflected God’s design rather than our own.  We can not time travel back to the first century, but we can read their documents to see how they understood “Church.”   It is good to look at history to observe how things “were”.  We often look at how things “are” and assume that’s this is the way things  are supposed to “be”… Read the rest of this entry