How The Early Church Spotted a False Prophet…Your Answer to Our Poll

Not For Itching Ears-false-prophetHow is your Early Church History?

Last week we posted a poll called “Do You Know How The Early Church (pre 150AD) Spotted A False Prophet” (Take the poll!)  In it, we gave respondents 5 answers to choose from and only one choice was correct.  It is important to note that this poll did not include all the ways the early church spotted a false prophet.  Also, the one correct choice was taken from the Didache, a respected early church document written sometime between 50AD and 150AD.  Do you know the right answer?  Let us look at them one at a time:

5.  They Believed The Gifts of The Spirit Had Not Ceased.  FALSE! 6% of respondents identified this as the correct answer.

 4.  They Taught That There Were Two Ways Only: The Way of Life or The Way of Death:  FALSE, and almost 13% of respondents chose this as the answer,

3.  They Taught that People had Free Will and Could Choose to Follow Christ. FALSE!  13% of those polled chose this as the correct answer which would be a popular answer for followers of Calvin.

2.  They Taught that Water Baptism Could be Done Without Immersion, FALSE!  It is not surprising that this answer was chosen by 19% of those who took the poll.  However, the early church did not make as big a deal about this as modern day Protestants.  They preferred immersion in running water, but allowed pouring water over the head if running water was not available.

Fifty percent of respondents chose the correct answer.    So,  how did the church spot a false prophet?  Drum roll pleeeeeease!

1.  They Asked For Money!

“Now concerning the apostles and prophets, deal with them as follows in accordance with the rule of the gospel.  Let every apostle who comes to you be welcomed as if he were the Lord.  But he is not to stay for more than one day, unless there is need, in which case he may stay another.  But if he stays three days, he is a false prophet.  And when the apostle leaves, he is to take nothing except bread until he finds his next nights lodging.  But if he asks for money, he is a false prophet. Didache 11:3-6

Think about this.  If they asked for money, they were to be considered false prophets.  Why do you think the early church used this as part of the criteria?  Just as importantly, why do we not use this criteria today and if we did, how would things change?

BONUS:  Here’s another way the Didache instructed believers to recognize wolves in sheep’s clothing:  They did not practice what they preached!

“If any prophet teaches the truth, yet does not practice what he teaches, he is a false prophet.”  Didache 11:10

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About Jim

Not For Itching Ears is a blog dedicated to discussing the American Evangelical church. It is a place for people to share their thoughts on a host of issues relating to this subject. Jim is available to speak at weekend services, and retreats at no cost to churches in Florida. Contact us for more information.

Posted on April 30, 2014, in Christianity, Early Church History, Theology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I get frustrated and confused when the yearly “tithing” message comes up in churches basically saying we should tithe (10%) of our income and say its based on biblical giving. Some points to ponder from my understanding (please correct me if I’m wrong or teach me more):

    1. Tithing is mentioned in the Old Testament.
    2. Tithing was to support for priests/Levites.
    3. It wasn’t about giving money, it was about giving crops and livestock.

    I found this too: http://www.biblegateway.com/resources/commentaries/IVP-NT/2Cor/Guidelines-Giving

    Like

  1. Pingback: Quit Scratching Your Ears | Resting in His Grace

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